Schedule
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Key Drivers
Schedule Basics
Dependency
Schedule Example
Rule Sets
Rules
Configuration
Modelling Techniques
Variants

A schedule is a sequence of activities (both system and manual) that can be planned together. It is the response to a trigger event.

A schedule can be further described by a series of macro level tasks. Each of these tasks can fulfil a goal of a user (and thus can be standalone in its own right). From a user’s perspective they are black box. Thus a schedule can be perceived as a broader end to end process.

Tasks are a composites of low level activity – which is defined as something that actually does something (a set of code being executed, or a person performing something) and has a result. By allowing both the system and human duties being performed in the same end-to-end the schedule can fulfil the responsibilities of a classic workflow (or job management)

The building blocks of a schedule are thus:

bulletSchedule
bulletTasks
bulletSystem Activities
bulletManual Activities

This can be modelled as is shown here, with a business example of each (note this examples is built upon as we go along and is concluded with a detailed version):

These activities can be:

bulletReal-time
bulletBatch

To a large extent the flow of events is very similar to those of in both cases, but generally speaking:

bulletFor event driven the trigger is often unpredictable, the execution is perceived real-time and is performed on a individual logical transaction,
bulletFor batch driven the trigger tends to be predictable (a 10pm trigger is after all certain to occur), the execution has a processing window, and is performed on a often large group of logical transactions.

But these are not hard and fast rules - since even event driven processes could be designed to have a predictable trigger - for example it may be desirable to only initiate the accept trade task between certain hours, the start and end could be defined as temporal triggers.

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© 2002-2005 Codel Services Ltd

This paper has been prepared by Codel Services Ltd to illustrate how structured business modelling can help your organisation. Codel Services Ltd is an IT Consultancy specialising in business modelling. If you would like further information, please contact us at: Deryck Brailsford, Codel Services Ltd, Dale Hill Cottage, Kirby-Le-Soken, Essex CO13 0EN,United Kingdom. Telephone: +44 (0)1255 862354/Mobile: + 44 (0)7710 435227/e-mail: info@codel-services.com